New at Orem Library

DVDs

now-you-see-me-2 Now You See Me 2, AD 19037/2

The four horsemen resurface to expose a tech magnate’s unethical practices, while at the same time trying to clear their names.

tmnt Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows, KZ 1225/7

After super villain Shredder escapes custody, he joins forces with mad scientist Baxter Stockman and two dimwitted henchmen, Bebop and Rocksteady, to unleash a diabolical plan to take over the world. As the Turtles prepare to take on Shredder and his new crew, they find themselves facing an even greater evil with similar intentions: the notorious Krang.

Captain America.jpg Captain America: Civil War, FA 17637/3

After another incident involving the Avengers results in collateral damage, political pressure mounts to install a system of accountability, headed by a governing body to oversee and direct the team. The new status quo fractures the Avengers, resulting in two camps, one led by Steve Rogers and his desire for the Avengers to remain free to defend humanity without government interference, and the other following Tony Stark’s surprising decision to support government oversight and accountability.

Junior Nonfiction

ouch Ouch! Moments: When Words are Used in Hurtful Ways, Michael Genhart, PhD

The reader is encouraged to be caring and to take a stand when someone uses hurtful words.

the-great-bicycle-experiment The Great Bicycle Experiment: The Army’s Historic Black Bicycle Corps, 1896-97, Kay Moore

A true adventure story about an elite company of twenty African American soldiers who in 1897 embarked on a 1,900-mile trek across the country on bicycles.

marisol-mcdonald-and-the-monster Marisol McDonald and the Monster/Marisol McDonald y el monstruo, Monica Brown

A spunky, bilingual, multiracial girl finds her own way to conquer her fear of the nighttime monster that mysteriously appears in her home.

Una bilingüe, chica multirracial valiente encuentra su propia manera de conquistar su miedo del monstruo nocturno que misteriosamente aparece en su casa. 

eAudiobooks

truly-madly-guilty Truly Madly Guilty, Liane Moriarty

In Truly Madly Guilty, Liane Moriarty turns her unique, razor-sharp eye towards three seemingly happy families. Sam and Clementine have a wonderful, albeit busy, life: they have two little girls, Sam has just started a new dream job and Clementine, a cellist, is busy preparing for the audition of a lifetime. If there’s anything they can count on, it’s each other. Clementine and Erika are each other’s oldest friends. A single look between them can convey an entire conversation. But theirs is a complicated relationship, so when Erika mentions a last minute invitation to a barbecue with her neighbors, Tiffany and Vid, Clementine and Sam don’t hesitate. Having Tiffany and Vid’s larger than life personalities there will be a welcome respite. Two months later, it won’t stop raining, and Clementine and Sam can’t stop asking themselves the question: What if we hadn’t gone?

In Truly Madly Guilty, Liane Moriarty takes on the foundations of our lives: marriage, sex, parenthood, and friendship. She shows how guilt can expose the fault lines in the most seemingly strong relationships, how what we don’t say can be more powerful than what we do, and how sometimes it is the most innocent of moments that can do the greatest harm.

hillbilly-elegy Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis, J.D. Vance

Vance, a former marine and Yale Law School graduate, provides an account of growing up in a poor Rust Belt town that offers a broad, probing look at the struggles of America’s white working class. The decline of this group, a demographic of our country that has been slowly disintegrating over forty years, has been reported on with growing frequency and alarm. J. D. Vance tells the true story of what a social, regional, and class decline feels like when you were born with it hung around your neck. The Vance family story begins hopefully in postwar America. J. D.’s grandparents were “dirt poor and in love,” and moved north from Kentucky’s Appalachia region to Ohio in the hopes of escaping the dreadful poverty around them. They raised a middle-class family, and eventually their grandchild (the author) would graduate from Yale Law School, a conventional marker of their success in achieving generational upward mobility. But as the family saga of Hillbilly Elegy plays out, we learn that this is only the short, superficial version. Vance’s grandparents, aunt, uncle, sister, and, most of all, his mother, struggled profoundly with the demands of their new middle-class life, and were never able to fully escape the legacy of abuse, alcoholism, poverty, and trauma so characteristic of their part of America.

sweet-tomorrows Sweet Tomorrows, Debbie Macomber

Nine months ago, Mark Taylor abruptly left Cedar Cove on a perilous mission to right a wrong from his past. Though Mark finally confessed his love for her, innkeeper Jo Marie Rose is unsure if he’s ever coming back. The Rose Harbor Inn barely seems the same without Mark, but Jo Marie can’t bear to lose herself in grief once more. Determined to move forward, she begins dating again, and finds companionship when she takes on a boarder who is starting a new chapter herself. Recovering from a twice-broken heart, Emily Gaffney, a young teacher, is staying at the inn while she looks for a home of her own. Having given up on marriage, Emily dreams of adopting children someday. She has her eye on one house in particular — with room for kids. Although Emily’s inquiries about the house are rudely rebuffed, her rocky start with the owner eventually blossoms into a friendship. But when the relationship verges on something more, Emily will have to rethink what she truly wants and the chances she’s willing to take. The inn seems to be working its magic again — Emily opening herself up to love, Jo Marie moving on — until Jo Marie receives shocking news. Sweet Tomorrows brings to a close the journeys of cherished characters who feel like old friends.

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